Monday Hunk Who Reads – Ryan Gosling

gdcgraphics [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

gdcgraphics [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Ryan Gosling

It’s the first of the month, and in an effort to get my old Hunk posts scrubbed of copyrighted material, I’m pulling up this one that had been taken offline and fixing it. So this month, it’s Ryan Gosling! He’s definitely a reader as there’s some photo documentation:

That book is so fucked up; that story’s the worst. I mean, at the end the tree is a stump and the old guy just sitting on him #8212; he’s just used him to death, and you’re supposed to want to be the tree? Fuck you. You be the tree. I don’t want to be the tree.

Is he keeping the tattoo though?

Tangentially related to reading, is his recent participation of Funny or Die’s Drunk History reading of A Night Before Christmas, also starring Eva Mendes and Jim Carrey.

It was hard finding out about his reading habits because of a certain meme we’ll explore below, but I did find out he was diagnosed with ADHD as a child which caused him to have trouble reading. He obviously conquered it. From that same article, he reveals this about Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, by Haruki Murakami: “You can’t put it down. All these movie studios are trying to buy his books and he won’t sell them.”

I gave up trying to find more about what he likes to read, however, because searching on Google for it was just too crowded with this phenomenon:

For some reason only the meme gods understand, he’s the subject of a number of “Hey Girl” internet memes that started with F*%kYeahRyanGosling where posters pretend he’s their boyfriend saying supportive/sexy things. There’s now a bunch of them (for computer nerds, museum loverspolitical junkies and many more) but the ones that relate to books I couldn’t resist sharing. This one for librarians, got a giggle from me:

And then one about reading YA books and I had to share this one because this seems to be the theme lately with my writing friends and me (*now going to post this as the blog post pic for my last writing post on internal dialog*):

And one where we pretend he’s in the world of publishing:

So that’s this month’s Hunk Who Reads. Reading is sexy people!

For further opportunities to idolize men and books:

Do you have any photos of male celebrities reading?

Come back next month to see the next Hunk Who Reads…

Past Hunks Who Read/Related Articles:

*previous Ovaries Exploding Award winner

Monday Hunk Who Reads – John Cusack

John Cusack [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

John Cusack [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

John Cusack

It’s the first Monday of the month and I’m also back to my regular blogging schedule, so what does that mean? It means a new hunk who loves books!

Darling of romcoms, there’s more to Cusack than the aw-shucks looks. Take a look at what books he likes! Oprah interviewed him for her feature Books That Made a Difference, and here’s what she found out:

Hunter S. Thompson’s Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail ’72 made the list. Here’s what he says:

His mixture of artistic sensibilities with journalistic excellence, all to find the core of truth—I thought that was pretty incredible. Mostly, I admired the ferocity of Hunter’s mind.

And living in Alabama as I do, I can’t fault him at all for having To Kill a Mockingbird on the list. Also making the cut were Bob Dylan’s Chronicles: Volume One, The Great Thoughts, From Abelard to Zola, from Ancient Greece to Contemporary America, the Ideas that have Shaped the History of the World, Naomi Klein’s The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, J.D. Salinger’s Franny and Zooey, Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer, and Modris Eksteins’ Rites of Spring: The Great War and the Birth of the Modern Age. The latter he said:

It’s probably got as much insight and wizardry as any book I’ve ever come across. If you read nothing else, read chapter ten, ‘Spring Without End.

Here he is at last year’s LA Times Festival of Books. He was there promoting The Raven, but went on to mention books he’s reading:

In which he mentions his two recent faves are Nick Tosches’ In the Hand of Dante and Mark Layner’s The Sugar Frosted Nutsack. Wow, what a title that last one is! He also mentions having read another Eksteins book Walking Since Daybreak : A Story of Eastern Europe, World War II, and the Heart of Our Century.

So that’s this month’s Hunk Who Reads. Reading is sexy people!

For further opportunities to idolize men and books:

Do you have any photos of male celebrities reading?

Come back next month to see the next Hunk Who Reads…

*previous Ovaries Exploding Award winner

Monday Hunk Who Reads – Joseph Gordon-Levitt

joseph-gordon-levitt-reading (1)

Gordon-Levitt reading | Photo courtesy of HitRecord.org

Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Like any child actor, he’s fighting against his earlier portrayals and looks, but one thing’s for sure, he’s turned into a cutie. He also reads:

The movies I watch and the music I listen to and the books I read – those are important to me. It’s very important to me, and I don’t know what I would do without those things. [source]

In this article, he was asked about his role in The Lookout, and he related:

Well, I did a fair amount of research. I did some reading. My favorite book I read was called ‘The Man with a Shattered World‘ which was about a veteran coming back from World War II.

According to TV.com, his favorite book is J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, and if there are any gaming geeks out there, he loved reading and playing Dungeons & Dragons when he was growing up. At the same website, he’s quoted as saying this about his role in Mysterious Skin:

I didn’t read the book till after I read the script, but probably more than any other movie I’ve ever been a part of, the movie turned out the way I thought it should look based on the script and the book.

He’s also friendly to authors, because when the author of Mysterious Skin tweeted that his book had gone on sale, he RTed it.

But guess what? If you didn’t know this already, he’s a part of the book world, by way of curating and editing. He has an online production company called HitRECord  that inspires users across the world to come together and create singular works of art, and it was through that site that the genesis for his Tiny Book of Tiny Stories came about, as well as other collaborations:

  • The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories: Volume 1 From hitRECord, the immensely popular open collaborative production company, and its founder, Golden Globe-nominated actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt, comes The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories: Volume 1. The universe is not made of atoms; it’s made of tiny stories. To create The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories: Volume 1, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, known within the hitRECord community as RegularJOE–directed thousands of collaborators to tell tiny stories through words and art. With the help of the entire creative collective, Gordon-Levitt culled, edited and curated over 8,500 contributions into this finely tuned collection of original art from 67 contributors. Reminiscent of the 6-Word Memoir series, The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories: Volume 1 brings together art and voices from around the world to unite and tell stories that defy size.
  • The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories: Volume 2 One of the most ingenious and successful projects to come out of Gordon-Levitt’s online creative coalition hitRECord – an international collaboration of artists and writers – The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories: Volume 2 offers more quirky, delightfully small, ingeniously illustrated haiku-like tales, proving once more that the universe isn’t made of atoms; it’s made of tiny stories. The best things do come in small packages
  • HitRECord Recollection Vol. 1 Hardbound 64-page Book, DVD & CD. ‘RECollection: Volume 1′ is the very first anthology of hitRECord’s work, featuring the contributions of 471 collaborators. The eight-inch square, cloth-bound tome is a well-crafted and meticulously-designed piece of art. With equal attention given to each medium—video, audio, image, text—this relic of our records is rich in detail and a feast for the senses.
  • Little Red Riding Hood: Redux (The hitRECorderly #1) A beautiful book of hitRECord’s adaptation of the classic fairy tale – complete with artwork, essays, and paper doll cut-outs!

This LATimes interview talks more about HitRECord and Gordon-Levitt’s role.

Want more? You can follow him on Twitter and Goodreads!

So that’s this month’s Hunk Who Reads. Reading is sexy people!

For further opportunities to idolize men and books:

Do you have any photos of male celebrities reading?

Come back next month to see the next Hunk Who Reads…

*previous Ovaries Exploding Award winner

Monday Hunk Who Reads – Joe Manganiello

By Joe_Manganiello_5.jpg: Srakirei derivative work: RanZag (This file was derived from:  Joe_Manganiello_5.jpg) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Joe_Manganiello_5.jpg: Srakirei derivative work: RanZag (This file was derived from: Joe_Manganiello_5.jpg) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Joe Manganiello

Can I get a growl? Kicking off the first Monday Hunk Who Reads for the year with Joe Manganiello, best known for his role as the hot werewolf in True Blood. And clutch your pearls, girls, he reads!

This little nugget was in a DaMan article on Manganiello:

I grew up a misfit. I never fit in. I had all of these parts that were in direct conflict with each other. I was an athlete, but I was extremely artistic. I was a big strong kid who was also very sensitive and empathetic. I was a jock who was good at math and chess and loved to read … I didn’t know what group to hang out with in school until I started acting. When I did, I realized everyone was as weird and out of place as I was, and that I could combine all of those weird opposing characteristics together and create characters that made sense to me in my weird way. Acting was the only place that I ever felt like I belonged so went for it with everything I had. [emphasis mine]

In this HBO Connect interview we learn that of course he’s read Charlaine Harris’ Sookie Stackhouse series for his role, though he had this to say:

I think toward the end of season 5 Alcide toughens up quite a bit more than he does in the books and I couldn’t be happier about that. I am also thrilled about working with Robert Patrick. I think our relationship is so much more developed and nuanced [than] the books and that has been awesome to play

In the same interview, it’s revealed that his favorite book to re-read is The Hobbit, which was his fave growing up.

Flaunt.com did an article on him about the role of mythological beasts in the social climate, and learned tht Manganiello takes his acting very seriously, and not just in defining his abs–he reads lots of historical and mythological literature on wolves to prepare for his role as Alcide. As the article shares:

At mention of the social climate that invites an insurgence of supernatural media stars, Joe Manganiello sits discernibly taller in his seat. As a resident werewolf on the popular vampire series, True Blood, his credentials for our discussion to follow are promising, and within just moments of conversing, every bit deserving of the hype. Immediately, he confides how pleasant it is to discuss something other than his ab routine. “It’s really nice when you get to sit down and talk about what goes into the show and books about culture,” he says, “or why [True Blood] is popular and how it fits into the grand scheme of things.”
In just moments of speaking, his dedication and enthusiasm for his profession are admiringly evident, and, upon dissection of his upbringing, it is quickly apparent why this is. Manganiello was raised in Western Pennsylvania by a working-class father, who bestowed a blue-collar work ethic upon his children. Today, this robust conditioning translates to caring for his role with the same force by which his grandfather proudly shoveled coal. Though the most superficial and identifiable fruits of his labors are shown in his physique, in regards to his workouts Manganiello insists that he “approach[es] everything with this same level of intensity” and goes on to cite the comprehensive list of books and films he has added to his gamut in an effort to prepare for this role. His words are validated with a book on hand—gifted by a fan—on the history of English werewolves circa 1865.

Mythology lovers will like what he has to say here, from the same article:

As Manganiello points out, this human method of coping is “a classic formula from the dawn of mythology.” He describes how, in order to explain the unexplainable, the Ancient Greek and Egyptian gods were given very human qualities, “creating these mythological creatures who make very human mistakes” in order to understand mortality. This really is no different from True Blood, he explains, “because really the show is not about vampires and werewolves, but instead is about being human, and how these people with massive handicaps try to feel love, give love, have sex, be normal, fit into society, and deal with loss.” Manganiello draws another connection to mythology, this time in reference to his True Blood character Alcide, explaining, “The name Alcide is actually a derivative of the name Hercules, who was cursed in Greek mythology.” It is no secret to the storyline that Alcide feels cursed in being a werewolf, and Manganiello empathizes in remembrance of a lonely adolescence.

In this interview, he states that his favorite book is Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead.

Here’s a pic of him reading Bram Stoker’s Dracula…

Want more? You can follow him on Twitter!

So that’s this month’s Hunk Who Reads. Reading is sexy people!

For further opportunities to idolize men and books:

Do you have any photos of male celebrities reading?

Come back next month to see the next Hunk Who Reads…

*previous Ovaries Exploding Award winner

Monday Hunk Who Reads – Don Cheadle

By Made In Hollywood from Hollywood, CA, United States (Don Cheadle at his Brooklyn's Finest Interview) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Made In Hollywood from Hollywood, CA, United States (Don Cheadle at his Brooklyn’s Finest Interview) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Don Cheadle

Ecorazzi, reporters of good gossip, confirm that critically-acclaimed US actor Don Cheadle loves books, for he’s joined the Book People Unite campaign:

Don Cheadle wants kids to read and he is helping kids do just that by joining with Reading Is Fundamental’s latest campaign “Book People Unite.” A recent tweet from @IamDonCheadle reads: “Fact: only 1 book for every 300 kids living in poverty. Watch RIF’s PSA & help get books to kids.http://bit.ly/bookpeopleunite @RIFWeb.”

So what does he like to read? Oprah profiled him in her column “Books That Made A Difference” and for him it is: DBC Pierre’s Vernon God Little, Rusty Young and Thomas McFadden’s Marching Powder: A True Story of Friendship, Cocaine, and South America’s Strangest Jail, Chester Himes’ If He Hollers Let Him GoMiles: The Autobiography, Khaled Hosseini’s The Kite Runner. Here’s what he said about Vernon God Little:

This book, about a boy named Vernon who’s accused of being involved in a Columbine-style massacre at his school, is completely unexpected. Vernon is extremely foulmouthed but in a really delightful way. You may come to different conclusions about what he should do next—running away to Mexico seems like a bad idea—but Pierre has created such a vivid and expressive voice for Vernon that you feel the injustices he suffers acutely and you begin to understand his skewed outlook and the choices he makes.

And about The Kite Runner:

I know this novel was a book-club darling, but I heard about it from a friend who was going to produce it as a film…There are moments in this book where I gasped—scenes of brutality and surprise that just chilled me.

He’s also the co-author of co-author of Not on Our Watch: The Mission to End Genocide in Darfur and Beyond

Follow him on Twitter….

Reading is sexy people!

So that’s this month’s Hunk Who Reads. If you like these articles, please comment. They’re fun to write, but are time-consuming :) — on that note, if you run across any photos of hunks reading, please let me know. If you know of an intellectual hunk you’d like to see profiled, let me know that too.Reading is sexy people!

For further opportunities to idolize men and books:

Do you have any photos of male celebrities reading?

Come back on the first Mondays of each month to see the next Hunk Who Reads…

Past Hunks Who Read/Related Articles:

*previous Ovaries Exploding Award winner

Monday Hunk Who Reads – Keanu Reeves

By Y! Música (Flickr) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Keanu Reeves

Seriously! Read on, and I’ll make a believer out of you! I was first alerted to this by seeing a bio of romance author Liz Matis and her answer to the question “Who would you prefer to go on a date with, George Clooney, Brad Pitt, or someone else?” Her answer? “Hands down, no competition – Keanu Reeves. You might be surprised to know that he loves to read. I picture us meeting in the poetry aisle at a Barnes and Noble, he buys me a hot chocolate and we talk about books.”

I stored that nugget away until I could profile him and was so glad I did. I find this interesting article in Details magazine, in which this is an excerpt:

“He is the opposite of dumb,” says Scott Derrickson, who directed him in December’s The Day the Earth Stood Still. “That is a word that has no applicationto him. This is not just a director trying to defend his actor and say, ‘No, really, he’s not dumb.’ He’s fiercely intelligent.”… So could it be? Is Keanu Reeves some kind of . . . stealth genius? “I’ve swapped a lot of books with him in the last nine months. He is one of the most voracious readers I’ve ever met,” Derrickson says. “He’s very unpretentious about it. Nobody really knows, and he doesn’t really care that nobody knows.”

No. It becomes clear after 30 seconds of watching Keanu pinball around the aisles of Book Soup that he approaches the printed word as both a glutton and a gourmand: He inhales a lot, and he’s game to order off-menu. He tells me he just finished all of the novels in John Updike’s Rabbit series. “So fantastic,” he says with a reverent hush. I mention another work about suburban crisis, Richard Yates’ Revolutionary Road, and he rears back and slides the helmet onto his head so that he can free up his left hand. “Oh, YES!!!” he shouts. “Let’s high-five on Revolutionary Road!” We slap palms. This prompts a rumination from Keanu on the primary characters in that book, Frank and April Wheeler, and “the identities that they’re wearing—you know, their authentic self and then their external self and that dialogue that’s going on.”

As we pass Proust, Keanu reveals that he devoured every page of the meticulous colossus that is Remembrance of Things Past. “It took a couple of years, but I did it,” he says. The grin has straightened itself; it’s ear-to-ear now. “I didn’t do the Moncrief, I did the newer translation. Some books would come in between. But I found that it was a thread—like time—that you could walk away and come back to. I didn’t feel like I had lost the momentum of the story at all. It was like meeting a good friend or someone that you like, and you’re like, ‘Hey, dude! How’s it goin’?’”

It’s worth reading the article in its entirety. In it, they visit Book Soup, the bookstore in Los Angeles, which he’s been visiting for 20 years and knows the sales clerk by name. He rattles off books he likes: “James Salter’s A Sport and a Pastime? Yes, he’s read that. David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas? That too, yes. The Butcher, an erotic novel by Alina Reyes? Absolutely. He’s never put off by a dash of kink—in fact, he’d be happy to recommend a volume in that vein. “You’ve read Bataille, right?”” And off they go to search for that. The store didn’t have it, but Reeves recommends The Elementary Particles by Michel Houellebecq, which he said made his head explode when he read it. Later in the article, they are on a long drive and Reeves recites from three different Shakespeare sonnets.

Some industrious denizen of Goodreads has helpfully gathered the books he likes. He also penned a satirical self-help book called “Ode to Happiness.

Here is a picture of him with a Chapter book from Frank151

So that’s this month’s Hunk Who Reads. If you like these articles, please comment. They’re fun to write, but are time-consuming :) — on that note, if you run across any photos of hunks reading, please let me know. If you know of an intellectual hunk you’d like to see profiled, let me know that too.Reading is sexy people!

For further opportunities to idolize men and books:

Do you have any photos of male celebrities reading?

Come back on the first Mondays of each month to see the next Hunk Who Reads…

Past Hunks Who Read/Related Articles:

*previous Ovaries Exploding Award winner

Monday Hunk Who Reads – Colin Firth

By Rathika Mawtus [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Colin Firth

What? No book in the pic? Before we move on to the awesomeness that is Colin Firth, first a little housecleaning. The Monday Hunk Who Reads feature is now in a different format and schedule, due to the blog post by Roni Loren about usage of photos in blogs. Basically, it boils down to: I was doing a big No-No all this time. I immediately pulled down all the articles and am slowly working my way through to get permission for the photos. I’d thought that if I attributed/linked back, I was fine, especially since it promoted a good cause–reading. So, if you’re wondering where they all went, that’s why. There’s a few back up now, especially the most popular: Dan Stevens.

What this means going forward, is that if I cannot get permission to post the photo that features our hunk with a book, I will only be able to link to it. So that means no opening glitzy photo. From here on out, the opening photo will most likely feature the hunk without a book that is in the public domain.

Like above!

It also means, since more work will be involved, and more lead-time needed, that this feature will only be published on the first Mondays of each month.

Actually, I’ve been wanting to do Firth for a while, as I knew he was a reader, but could not find him with a book, so I couldn’t profile him. Now I can!

Now onto Firth and books…

According to this article in the Belfast Telegraph, Firth is an avid reader and “views his books as ‘old acquaintances'” and loves his collection of books. It turns out though, that this Kindle skeptic has become a convert.

“[I bought] a Kindle. I was a skeptic-what about the feel of a book, the smell? But I found it surprising how unimportant that became,” he told People magazine.

“No [I haven’t switched over completely], if I love a novel, part of me just wants the book. The picture on the cover. And I like glancing up at books on my shelves. They’re rather like old acquaintances.”

Colin feels transformed by the works he’s read that were penned by his favourite authors.

“William Faulkner would be on the list-The Sound and the Fury. John Cheever’s stories, Richard Ford,” he shared. “I’d never read Jane Austen before I [played Mr Darcy] in Pride and Prejudice; she was a revelation. I went through every book and wished there were more.

In Oprah’s column “Books That Made A Difference,” Firth shared:

When I’m really into a novel, I’m seeing the world differently during that time—not just for the hour or so in the day when I get to read. I’m actually walking around in a bit of a haze, spellbound by the book and looking at everything through a different prism.

I’m paraphrasing terribly from a theory I came across years ago, but there was this idea that everyone leads a kind of secret life. All of these things are going on around us that we don’t process consciously but that stay with us. There’s a school of thought that inanimate objects can make you feel certain things and you don’t know why. You pick up a green mug and you drink coffee out of it and you’re not thinking about anything except whether the coffee is good or bad. About an hour later, you feel depressed and you don’t know why. Perhaps the mug is exactly the same color as your grandmother’s. You’re aware of the emotion but you didn’t know your subconscious went through a whole thing—remembered something, relived something, and fed it back to you.

So a book can pull out responses that would be dormant otherwise. I find that a very valuable thing to have as a possibility. I’m not simply responding to the author’s vision. The joy I take from a book is mine. It comes from me.

So what else does he like to read? in the above Oprah article, it says he “goes for psychological intrigue, moral mud puddles and lyrical truth-telling.” In another Oprah profile, this is what’s on his bookshelf: Rainer Maria Rilke’s The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge, Graham Greene’s The Power and the Glory, Giuseppe di Lampedusa’s The Leopard, David Gates’ Preston Falls, Anne Tyler’s Saint Maybe, William Faulkner’s Light in August, and Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections.

About Rilke’s book, Firth says:

I don’t think I’ve ever read such descriptions of what it would be like to lose your grip. He has a vision that makes you less sure of your surroundings—and I find that stimulating.

About Greene’s The Power and The Glory, he says:

This is about a man—the whiskey priest—on the run in a Mexican state during a purge of religious figures. The most poignant thing in the story, for me, is that the priest has had a child. He wants to repent, but how can you find salvation when you can’t hate the sin? He’s stuck in that paradox: The one thing that prevents him from repenting is love. That so interests me—the idea of looking for spiritual salvation in what is otherwise an impossibly compromised life.

Be sure to click through and read the rest of what he thinks about each book he’s named above.

According to this article on CBS, Firth would sometimes skip school to read! He’s also lending his talent to recording classics for Audible.com. In this article, he states that he’s reading John Fante’s Ask the Dust, about Los Angeles in the 1930s.

Reading is sexy people!

So that’s this month’s Hunk Who Reads. If you like these articles, please comment. They’re fun to write, but are time-consuming :) — on that note, if you run across any photos of hunks reading, please let me know. If you know of an intellectual hunk you’d like to see profiled, let me know that too.

For further opportunities to idolize men and books:

Do you have any photos of male celebrities reading?

Come back next month to see the next Hunk Who Reads…

Past Hunks Who Read/Related Articles:

*previous Ovaries Exploding Award winner

Monday Hunk Who Reads – Billy Crudup

Billy crudup

Thousandrobots at en.wikipedia [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Billy Crudup

I simply HAD to see if this hunk was a reader after seeing him in Stage Beauty last week. He was absolutely incredible in that movie–I was literally on the edge of my seat during one of the scenes, it was so compelling. Thank you wonkomance.com for alerting me to this movie!

Anyway, here’s a picture of him helping his son sign up for a library card! It was part of a fundraiser for the NYPL Young Cubs program.

And in 2009 he participated in the NYPL’s Young Lions Awards for fiction. The award honors the works of authors age 35 and under who are making an indelible impression on the world of literature. Here’s a picture of him with one of the finalists.

In October of 2011, he participated in a fundraiser with several other stars for  the Starry Night Stories fundraiser, a benefit for Children of Bellevue’s Reach Out and Read program. Crudup reads the children’s book Duck for President. Here are some highlights (which include Crudup):

In the movie Dedication, he plays a children’s book author, and in this interview, he reveals that his favorite kid’ books are Shel Silverstein’s Where the Sidewalk Ends and The Giving Tree.

Reading is sexy people!

So that’s this week’s Hunk Who Reads. If you like these articles, please comment. They’re fun to write, but are time-consuming :) — on that note, if you run across any photos of hunks reading, please let me know. If you know of an intellectual hunk you’d like to see profiled, let me know that too.

For further opportunities to idolize men and books:

Do you have any photos of male celebrities reading?

Come back next Monday to see the next Hunk Who Reads…

Past Hunks Who Read/Related Articles:

*previous Ovaries Exploding Award winner

Monday Hunk Who Reads – George Clooney

Posing with Jacob, whose story was the inspiration for this book, A Hare in the Elephant’s Trunk by Jan L. Coates

George Clooney

He’s one of those guys that gets better looking as he ages, don’t you think? He didn’t use to do it for me. But anyway, since we had Noah Wyle last week, a sharp-eyed commenter spotted his co-star in ER, George Clooney, with a book and it seemed only appropriate to feature him this week.

Here’s a photo of him reading Al Gore’s book, The Assault on Reason.

Apparently, his favorite book is Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace! Whereas, this source says it’s Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, a book that says we can change the world by empowering women.

And here’s a peek into his LA home, where you can see books play a normal part of his life.

(h/t to Linda Morris whose sharp eye spotted Clooney’s photo)

Reading is sexy people!

So that’s this week’s Hunk Who Reads. If you like these articles, please comment. They’re fun to write, but are time-consuming :) — on that note, if you run across any photos of hunks reading, please let me know. If you know of an intellectual hunk you’d like to see profiled, let me know that too.

For further opportunities to idolize men and books:

Do you have any photos of male celebrities reading?

Come back next month to see the next Hunk Who Reads…

Monday Hunk Who Reads – Marlon Brando

Photo by Edward Clark © Time Inc., Courtesy of LIFE.com

Marlon Brando

Monday Hunk Who Reads is back! I took longer off than I’d planned, but it was a very productive break. Thought I’d kick off by going retro this morning!

Couldn’t find much, but here’s what I did find… In his autobiography, Brando: Songs My Mother Taught Me, he said:

I had to read Wuthering Heights for English and I never enjoyed a book in all my life as much as that one.

According to this article, he loved to read philosophy and could sit around discussing it for hours

Apparently a lot has been said about Brando showing up corpulent for his role in Apocalypse Now and many wonder if he read Conrad’s Heart of Darkness (book the movie was based on) at all. This book writer at The Guardian, has a different take on it.

According to imdb.com, his assistant Marchak pestered him to read Puzo’s bestseller The Godfather, wanting him to make a bid for the role. At one point he threw the book at her, saying, “For the last time, I won’t glorify the Mafia!” But then he kept coming to her with different moustaches, asking her how they looked. Obviously, he changed his mind :)

Here’s another pic of him reading

(h/t to Carrie Cox for the idea and one of the photos!)

So that’s this week’s Hunk Who Reads. If you like these articles, please comment. They’re fun to write, but are time-consuming :) — on that note, if you run across any photos of hunks reading, please let me know. If you know of an intellectual hunk you’d like to see profiled, let me know that too.

For further opportunities to idolize men and books:

Reading is sexy people!

Do you have any photos of male celebrities reading?

Come back next Monday to see the next Hunk Who Reads…

*previous Ovaries Exploding Award winner