Weekend Grab Bag – From Writing Tips to Jedi Squirrels

Since I missed last week, these linkies go back 2 weeks. Enjoy!

Song playing right now on my playlist: “A Postcard to Henry Purcell,” from the Pride & Prejudice (2005) soundtrack.

Writing and the Writing Life:

Jane Austen:

  • Jane Austen Fight Club. Okay, this had me giggling:

Browncoats:

Randomness and Geekdom:

Weekend Grab Bag – From Writing Tips to Vader ‘You Can’t Touch This’

Still needing some sleep, but am mostly recovered from Mardi Gras. Since I missed last week, these linkies go back 2 weeks. Enjoy!

Song playing right now on my playlist: “The Promise,” from The Piano soundtrack.

Writing and the Writing Life:


Romance Writers:

Jane Austen:

Browncoats:

  • Best baby portrait ever!

Randomness and Geekdom:

Weekend Grab Bag – From Writing Tips to LOTR as band instruments

Ah, another Saturday morning and I’m sipping a cup of Yerba Maté tea and listening to the sweet sounds of raccoons fighting in the ceiling and walls above and around me. Song playing right now on my playlist: “He Won’t Go,” Adele.

Writing and the Writing Life:


Romance Writers:

Jane Austen:

  • Over at the new blog, The Popular Romance Project, Dr. Sarah Frantz wrote a piece called Austen, romance novelist about the reluctance of some Janeites to call her books Romances because it’s good literature, so of course it can’t be Romance…

Browncoats:

  • An artist has done some awesome posters of different sci-fi favorites reworked various ways. Here’s his Firefly Muppets mashup

Randomness and Geekdom:

Weekend Grab Bag – From Writing Tips to P&P Ceramic Tiles

Writing and the Writing Life:

Romance Writers:


Browncoats:

  • Who will you vote for?

Ada Lovelace:

  • Okay, this isn’t about her directly, but a relation. It’s just so uncanny I had to post. This is the future Lord Byron who swam the Hellespont like his ancestor Lord Byron. Look at the resemblance!

Jane Austen:

In Geekdom:

Weekend Grab Bag – From Writing Tips to a Mr. Darcy lollipop

Writing and the Writing Life:

Romance Writers:

Browncoats:

  • Check out this craft Browncoat who made a gingerbread house in the shape of our favorite ship.
  • Oh, love it! A new meme, this time for Browncoats. It’s Jubal Early logic. There’s not that many yet, and some of them aren’t that funny, but it just started a couple of days ago, so Browncoats, get busy ;)

Ada Lovelace:

Jane Austen:

In Geekdom:

  • For those geeky about books like me, you might enjoy following this tumblr account: bookshelfporn
  • And I’ll leave you with this:

Weekend Grab Bag – From Writing Tips to Geek V-Day cards

Writing and the Writing Life:

Romance Writers:

Browncoats:

Ada Lovelace:

Jane Austen:

In Geekdom:

Weekend Grab Bag – From Writing Tips to an online Regency Hero dressup doll!

Writing and the Writing Life:

Browncoats:

  • There’s a petition formed on Facebook to try and convince Netflix to bring back Firefly

Jane Austen:

In Geekdom:

Weekend Grab Bag – From Writing Tips to Jane Austen to Klingon Monopoly

Writing:

Authors sharing some personal adventures:

Romancelandia:

  • An awesome video about why the Romance genre is scorned. Is it a revolutionary act?

Ada Lovelace:

Browncoats:

Jane Austen:

In Geekdom:

Weekend Grab Bag – Writing, Austen as a Comic, and more

Sorry for the delay (did you even notice?). Yesterday morning some of wordpress.com’s servers were experiencing issues and I couldn’t even access this site. I’m glad I’d been calling it Weekend Grab Bag, so without further ado:

Writing:

Ada Lovelace:

  • Someone on tumblr is making RPG cards of historical figures, Love It! So they did one for Ada Lovelace! Something tells me she would’ve loved RPG…
  • Sydney Padua, creator of the Lovelace & Babbage webcomic, now has a Lovelace & Babbage app for the iPad! Will she do one for the android?

Austenites:

  • Teh awesome! For geeks who like Austen, Marvel comics has Northanger Abbey as a comic!
  • Wouldn’t it be cool to have your favorite novel printed out as a poster? Spineless classics has Emma, Pride and Prejudice and Persuasion (my fave).

In Geekdom:

That’s it for this weekend, have a great one and enjoy the extra hour!

You Say Tomato, I Say Tomahto – The Challenge of Multiple POVs

My current novel has two Points of View (POV), and boy are they completely different. One is the quirky, slightly dorky heroine from modern-day America, and the other is a sweet, hunky hero from 1834. (It’s a time-travel romance). As you can imagine, their voices are completely different in tone and syntax. I thought I’d share my method of making damn sure they didn’t sound alike, not because I think this is THE WAY to do it, or that it is in any way groundbreaking, but just in case it might work for another.

  1. First and foremost, this WIP is an outcome of last November’s NaNoWriMo, and so as such, I didn’t have a lot of time for research and dilly-dallying. I wrote quick and dirty (not that kind of dirty; the sloppy-kind of dirty) and let the characters talk to me and tell me about themselves as I wrote. I didn’t worry too much about the hero’s voice other than writing his without contractions (which had the added benefit of adding to my word count. Weee!). I just let his voice come out without forcing it at this stage or worrying if it was anachronistic. I think this part is important, because if you worry too much about anachronisms at the creation stage, you can stifle your creativity. That’s what revision is for (and critique partners!)
  2. Starting in February I reread all of Jane Austen’s novels (I know, what a chore! <– sarcastic tone) and watched the adaptations I have and loaded up my Netflix queue with the rest. Basically I breathed, ate, slept and slurped Austen. Total immersion.
  3. When I was dreaming, thinking and accidentally talking like Austen’s characters, I knew I was ready.
  4. While doing this, I started a notebook where I wrote down patterns of speech she employed and also made a sort of glossary of words (modern word – Austen word pairing)*
  5. Next, I got some pink and blue post-it flags from Office Depot and went through my draft and marked the respective boy/girl POV switches.
  6. Then, I flipped to each blue section and revised the sentence structures, rhythm and word choices. I probably made about 2-3 passes total through it, just focusing on this and nothing else (not continuity, not plot, nothing but his voice).
  7. I then integrated these changes into a new draft and went from there. Of course, this method skipped any dialogue of his while in her POV, but by the time I got to those, I had his voice (I hope!)

The biggest problem that evolved out of this was my heroine picking up word choices that she wouldn’t normally use. I tend to write more formally also (this blog is helping me shed this habit) and so on revision, I had to concentrate on analyzing her word choices and syntax and making sure it was modern-sounding. Reading her parts out loud helped to catch more. However, I allowed her tone to get more formal as she stayed longer in the past, as I think that would be a natural evolution.

I didn’t always catch her old-fashioned word choices, so luckily my fellow critiquers on critiquecircle.com pointed out when she sounded too much like the hero. They also helped me dial back the hero a bit. I wanted his tone to sound 19th Century, but not so much so that it left people scratching their heads (like my mom does when she reads tries to read Austen). One sentence of his that I liked because of the emphasis it gave to the starting phrase, one critiquer said sounded too much like Yoda. Yikes! Can’t have that, so had to revise that one.

I still worry I overdid him, so am biting my nails waiting to hear back from my Beta readers.

*Would anyone be interested in this list?

Have you written more than one POV for a novel? How did you keep their voices distinct?