Ack! Queries! Part 1 – Purpose and When to Start

gavin-query-letter-romanceI’ve been a baaad girl with blogging, so I thought I’d dip my toes back in slowly, with maybe a post a week. So to start off, I thought I’d share a presentation I did recently at my local writer’s group on writing queries, divided into digestible weekly installments.

For today, we’ll cover: Purpose, and When to Start since it seems like most blog topics on the subject of query writing cover the nuts and bolts of the letter itself (which I’ll get to as well).

Purpose of a Query

I know you probably think this is self-evident, but I see a lot of people in forums get hung up on this. It’s ONLY purpose is to make an agent request material. That’s it. It’s not some undertaking where you need to distill the plot of your book, give your life story, show all the cool worldbuilding you came up with, tell them all about your characters, etc.

Just get in and get out.

It’s a marketing tool. You just want to intrigue them! But not by telling them what a great writer you are, etc. Not that kind of marketing/sales pitch. Think Back Cover Blurb

When to Start

If we’re talking about writing the query itself, anytime during the writing process for your novel is a great time to start. For instance:

  • If you’re a plotter, see if you can write one before you start
  • If you’re a pantser, see if you can write it when you start revisions

Why? No better test to see if you have a central conflict, theme and plot! If you can’t get it down into a nutshell, your novel has a problem, not your query. Better to discover this at this stage, than halfway through your query process and you’ve blown through most of your A-list. (And remember, this means you can’t query them again for this MS, even if you do revise it, unless they ask specifically for a revise and resubmit)

Use it as a revision tool and your manuscript will be stronger, and you’ll have a smoother query process.

I began in earnest to study and work on my query several months before my MS was ready. I used the ‘set-aside’ time, between major drafts, to do this.

But when to send it out?

Not until you’ve finished not only revising your novel, but also copy edited and polished and it’s abso-fricking-lutely ready for an agent to see. I had several agents request a FULL the same day I sent the queries! Agents (in general) are acting quicker now if they’re interested. Some are still slooow. But the smart agents (and don’t you want a smart one?) know they have to act quick.

I say this because I’ve had writers tell me they query before they’ve even written the first draft because they want to see if it’s got any interest. Don’t do this. If you’re thinking you’re wasting your time pouring your energy into a book only to have it not picked up, don’t. All that time is time well spent in honing your craft. So it doesn’t work out–move onto the next one with some stronger writing skills under your belt. I’ve also had a writer tell me she was thinking of querying while her book was with the editor she hired because she heard that agents can take a while to answer back so she wanted to telescope the process. That might have been true earlier, but, as I said above, agents are acting faster now. When I landed my agent, that first week I had fulls and partials being requested the same day. By the next week, I had a partial converted to a full, and I think it was only a week and a half after I started that I had my first offer. I ended up with three offers, and one common refrain from all three was how polished it was.

I’d also wait until:

  • You’ve sent your query to a few others (who’ve not read your book) for feedback.
  • You’ve trolled advice sites and read some truly bad ones and some stellar ones and can start critiquing theirs well. When you start to see what works and doesn’t and can articulate it to them, you get better with your own. Just like critiquing manuscripts.
  • You’ve got your list of agents ready and divided up into groups of 5-8. And this is assuming you’ve researched these agents and determined they’d be interested in your book! It also wouldn’t hurt to be following these agents on their blog/twitter a bit before you query. Many blog/tweet about what makes them reject, what they’d like to see, etc.

And that’s it for this week. Next week I’ll talk about elements of a successful query and some do’s and don’ts.

What about you? Are you querying yet? Have you tried writing a query as a revision tool?

Facebook Ads Could be Worth It, But For One Factor, Guest Post by Peter Salomon

facebook

I’d like to welcome not only a fellow writer, but also a college classmate of mine! We reconnected via social media several years ago to share our ups and downs, tips, and other facets of being a writer in today’s world. His debut novel, Henry Franks, debuted in 2012 and was hailed as “the thinking teen’s horror choice of the year!” He has a new release, All Those Broken Angels, due out this fall. As a debut author in this new social media age, he’s been experimenting with what works and what doesn’t. One of these experiments was with Facebook Ads, and he was gracious enough to write up his findings for all of us. It includes some real-time notes he made while the ad was running, so you can see the engagement and costs. So without further ado, Welcome, Peter!

One of the first things I did after officially becoming a published author is to create a Facebook fan page. Well, it was maybe top twenty things. At first it was only friends and family Liking the page, after all I was a debut novelist and not exactly well known. I still remember how thrilled I was when the first actual stranger clicked Like. A Fan!! Oh, wow, I have a fan!

So, as the book came out and the Likes started growing, it never did get old when someone clicked Like on the fan page. Even now, with my second book coming out shortly, I still feel that thrill when a new person clicks Like.

But things have changed in the land of Facebook. And not for the better from the perspective of an author with a Facebook fan page.

How I Got Started With Facebook Ads

When I hit 200 likes on my Facebook fan page I received an email from Facebook Ads offering me a $50 credit for a Facebook Ad. Since I was able to set it up to max out at $50 it wasn’t going to cost me anything to experiment so I figured it was worth seeing what would happen with a Facebook ad.

At this point in the experiment I started keeping track of what was going on (the following text is from my contemporaneous notes while the ad was live):

Contemporaneous Notes & Questions

So far I’ve been ‘charged’ $5 of the $50 and 23 strangers have ‘liked’ my fan page in the 4 days that the ad has been active. If that rate continues I’ll have added 100+ ‘likes’ in a month…which is a lot of new eyeballs viewing my page and my posts and, potentially, buying my books. Of course, that’s a mighty BIG ‘if’ there but so far it’s been fairly positive. I’ve been able to sort of extrapolate to see what those 23 people liking the page have meant by looking at my blog stats on those posts which I linked to from my Facebook page and it does look as though some of those people did click through (of course, there’s not really a great way to verify that but I’m making the assumption here…) and the views of my trailer for the next book on YouTube has been watched a number of times this week so maybe that’s from some of the people clicking the Facebook ad getting to my Facebook page and clicking through to YouTube since that’s the first post on my page. Again, a sizable assumption…
The one thing I do know is the 23 new ‘likes.’ Is that worth $5? It’s DEFINITELY worth ‘free’, which is what I’m currently paying.

This is the data from each of the 3 receipts I’ve received so far:

  • Likes – Ad 1,050 impressions (2 clicks)      $1.59
  • Likes – Sponsored Stories        7 impressions (0 clicks)   $0.06
  • Likes – Ad        1,026 impressions (4 clicks)      $0.85
  • Likes – Sponsored Stories        14 impressions (0 clicks) $0.08
  • Likes – Ad        6.606 impressions (6 clicks)      $1.76
  • Likes – Sponsored Stories        10 impressions (0 clicks) $0.04

Under ‘targeting’ I chose the following:

This ad targets 12,000,000 people:

  • who live in the United States, who like #Psychological thriller, #Mystery fiction, #Supernatural fiction, #Horror fiction, #Ghost story, #Science fiction or #Thriller (genre)
  • who are not already connected to Peter Adam Salomon.

—–

After doing some more research I was able to create a new ‘buy’ ad with a link to Amazon, also being paid for from the original credit. After 6 days with the new ad, I ended up deleting it. Why? Because, for the 6 days it ended up costing over $12 (so probably $13 or so a week). What did I get for that $12? Well, pretty much nothing. 18 strangers clicked on the ad to ‘Like’ the ad. Yes, they didn’t click through to like my page, they merely liked the ad. Which is useless. Only 2 strangers saw the ad and then searched to Like my page. No one clicked through to Amazon. Yes, no one.

I’m up to 32 new likes on my page, so only about 1-2 a day since I started the new ad. Oddly enough, it appears that the more expensive ad (that linked to Amazon) was the main ad that was popping up since the other ad didn’t get much exposure at all. I’ve killed the pricey one and we’ll see what happens now. I also changed the text on the ad to “The thinking teen’s horror choice of the year” (from the Booklist Starred review) so we’ll see if that changes things at all.

—–

2 weeks, $25 spent ($12 of it pretty much wasted on that ad that had people liking the ad), close to 50 new ‘likes’ on my page. If we ignore that $12, it’s pretty much right around $25 a month for (estimating here) 100 Likes. That’s well worth it if I keep that rate for the next 12 months until release of ALL THOSE BROKEN ANGELS (being over 1000 ‘fans’ would be a great thing for marketing then, no?). Might be worth continuing even after the credit runs dry. Who’d have thunk it?

—–

With 8 days left in ad campaign there was $8 left of the credit (still a little ticked off at the wasted $12 but oh well). 20 more new ‘Likes’ and I’ll be at 100 for the length of the campaign. So it’s going to translate to something close to $0.50 per ‘Like’ (massively estimating here and ignoring the wasted $12). If I keep the campaign going (having to spend my own money for the next 12 months, which would be somewhere in the $500 range, give or take) at that rate I’d be closing in on 2000 Likes by the time ALL THOSE BROKEN ANGELS comes out.

—–

So, the $64,000.00 question (or, in this case, $500 question) is: Does having ‘Likes’ on a fan page on Facebook lead directly, or indirectly, to actual book sales upon release of a book? 
Other than paying the money and waiting until Fall 2014 for release of ALL THOSE BROKEN ANGELS I don’t really see any way to actually answer that question (and even after release there’ll be no real way to tell other than to maybe ask those who have ‘Liked’ the page if they bought the book. I can’t see where it can possibly hurt to have more access and more eyeballs seeing posts about the book, no? 
And, in the grand scheme of things, $500 isn’t a TON of money (though it is a bunch…).

—–

At the end of the ad campaign I was at 298 Likes on my page. I began at 202. ‘Spent’ $50 of fake Facebook credit money and ended up with close to 100 new Likes from complete strangers. I’d have easily hit 100 if I hadn’t wasted the $12 on that secondary ad which only collected its own Likes for no reason whatsoever. I’m not 100% sure that 100 new Likes on my fan page will translate to any additional sales.

What does this mean? And the new role of facebook’s algorithm

For the amazing update to all of this: In December 2013, Facebook once again offered me a $50 credit (usable for one month only this time, this is important as I don’t recall their being a time limitation on the first credit). Well, I jumped at the chance. Results? Once again 100 new Likes in less than a month, so I am now over 400 Likes. Unfortunately, the ad credit ran dry before I had spent all $50. I actually ended up only spending about half of that credit. So, $50 would have ended up buying closer to 200 Likes. Which tracks pretty well, all things considered, with the original buy (if you include the wasted money on the first credit).

But, here’s the final kicker:

Now, with the new algorithms that Facebook is using that takes eyeballs away from ‘Fan Pages’ I’m no longer sure how many views each of my posts are getting. I do know that even with more ‘Fans’ I’m getting fewer views due solely to Facebook’s new and improved ‘algorithms.’

To compare, I’m NOT going to spotlight ‘big’ posts (such as announcements or cover reveals, which get more views due to shares, etc), instead, I’m just going to choose a random post: Specifically May 6, 2013. This post was PRIOR to the first credit, so at the time I had somewhere in the range of 200 Likes. The post, linking to a poetry post on my blog has the following text beneath it (added by Facebook): ’68 people saw this post’

For the sake of comparison, here is a poetry post from Jan. 22, 2014, when I was over 400 Likes. Again, the post simply links to a poetry post on my blog: ’22 people saw this post’

In other words, while my Likes DOUBLED, the actual eyeballs seeing my posts was cut down to less than one third.

That is due solely to Facebook’s new algorithms (there are countless articles and posts about that, simply Google it. The easiest way to explain it is that Facebook wants ‘businesses’ which they lump people like me into since I have a fan page, to PAY to boost posts).

My conclusion

Prior to those new rules I was definitely leaning toward buying the Facebook ad with the intention to push the Likes on my fan page over one thousand. Do the math: old rules, 200 Likes, 68 views. 2000 Likes would have been close to 700 views, close enough to 50% to make it worthwhile to have that many Likes.

New rules: 400 Likes, 22 views. 2000 Likes, 100 views? Somewhere in the neighborhood of FIVE PERCENT? And how many of those 5% are ‘friends’ who have liked my page? With the Likes via the Facebook ad, those are strangers. You know, actual fans! People I’d love to be able to communicate with, to connect with.

So, yes, Facebook ads are worth the money if your sole interest is in increasing the number of people Liking your page. However, due to the new algorithms, no matter how many Likes you have, fewer people are actually seeing your posts.

How to correct this? PAY to boost the posts, in addition to paying for the Facebook ad? I think the credits from Facebook are applicable to the ‘Boost Post’ function. If so, and if Facebook gives me another credit, perhaps I’ll test that and update this essay. Until then, however, I’m hesitant to spend money on Facebook ads without knowing if the ‘Boost Post’ function will have a lasting impact (in other words: does boosting one post, or even a couple, increase views going forward or only for those specific posts). I’d be far more likely to spend the money if the effect had staying power.

In my opinion, Facebook has done a great disservice to small businesses and the self-employed by these new algorithms. Worst of all, though, they’ve done themselves a disservice. I was all set to not only buy a Facebook ad to run for the next year but to recommend to other novelists that they do the same. After all, I pretty conclusively proved that their ads do produce Likes.

Instead, I’m left recommending people NOT give Facebook money for their ads solely due to Facebook’s own rules. That’s a poor business model, no?

And then there’s this, which sheds more light on the interplay of Likes and Engagements. Just who is liking your page?

Please let me know if you have any comments or suggestions or questions on this topic as I find it fascinating and am always looking for new ways to connect with my readers and to meet new readers!

About Peter Adam Salomon

PeterSalomonPeter Adam Salomon graduated Emory University in Atlanta, GA with a BA in Theater and Film Studies in 1989. He is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, the Horror Writers Association, the International Thriller Writers, and The Authors Guild and is represented by the Erin Murphy Literary Agency. His debut novel, HENRY FRANKS, was published by Flux in September 2012. His next novel, ALL THOSE BROKEN ANGELS, a ghost story set in Savannah, GA, is scheduled for publication in Fall 2014 by Flux.

His short fiction has appeared in Demonic Visions I and II and he was the featured author for Gothic Blue Book III: The Graveyard Edition. His poem ‘Electricity and Language and Me’ appeared on BBC Radio 6 performed by The Radiophonic Workshop in December 2013.

He was also a Judge for the 2006 Savannah Children’s Book Festival Young Writer’s Contest and served on the Jury for the Poetry Category of the 2013 Bram Stoker Awards.

Peter Adam Salomon lives in St. Petersburg, FL with his wife Anna and their three sons: André Logan, Joshua Kyle and Adin Jeremy.

Upcoming Release ALL THOSE BROKEN ANGELS

AllThoseBrokenAngelsComforted by a shadow. Haunted by the truth. Richard Anderson was the last person to see his friend Melanie alive. She vanished when they were six and while the police never found Melanie, a part of her remained—a living shadow that is now Richard’s closest friend.

For ten years, Richard has never questioned the shadow that keeps him company . . . until a new girl moves to town, claiming to be Melanie. Desperate to prove the girl is a fake, the shadow leads Richard to the place where her killer buried her bones. But Richard finds skeletons from several different children . . . and evidence suggesting that perhaps the shadow isn’t who she says she is.

More About the Book | Author’s Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pre-Order

RWA Countdown: One Stop Shop for Linkage

krlqqghz

Good Lord, we’re one week away! Instead of adding another blog post on prepping for the conference, I thought I’d do a round-up of posts to help you get ready:

Packing

What to expect

Planning

Pitching

Atlanta specific

RWA Countdown: A Primer on the Marriott Marquis

Marriott_Marquis_interior (1)Two weeks away, folks! I thought I’d do a quick little tour of the Marriott so that you’ll feel a little more at home there when you arrive. I’ve been attending Dragon*Con since 2005 and this hotel is one of the host hotels so I know it very well. The hitch might be that my observations are going to be based on experiencing the hotel while it is literally wall-to-wall people, which I doubt will be the case this time.

First of all, this is a beautiful hotel. The view upwards from the Atrium level to all the floors is amazing.

Since the room assignments haven’t been made, I won’t be able to get specific, but hopefully I can give you a general idea.

If you enter from the front entrance, you’ll be at the Lobby level, which is, of course, where you’ll check in (see, aren’t you glad you have me to help out?) Seriously though, it’s hard to know whether you’ll need to know this level much more than that. There is a Starbucks here, but the lines could be long, so you might want to pack your own Keurig (though the rooms come with a coffeemaker, I think, can’t remember). Next to it is the M Store, which is kind of like an airport store–I can’t remember all it has, but you’ll find some food there, like pre-made sandwiches, fruit, magazines, incidentals, and the like. Again, the line could be long. If you have time, I suggest using the skybridge to take you to the CVS in the Peachtree Center Food Court. Back at the Lobby level is also the Spa and Health Club.  There are some meeting rooms there, so we may have workshops there, who knows.

Now, from the Lobby level, you can take the escalators up or down. I’m going to guess that a lot of our activities are going to be one level down (Marquis Level) because there’s a concentration of ballrooms and meeting rooms there and it wouldn’t make us all spread out. Hopefully that’s where we’ll mostly be (conference event wise). One thing to note, is that toward the back there is a skybridge that will take you to The Hilton. I mention this, because in the lower level of the Hilton is Trader Vic’s tiki bar, an Atlanta institution. At the back of the Lobby level, there’s also a set of escalators that can take you back up to the Lobby level, or one level down to the International level, but I’d be surprised if we have stuff there, but you never know (watch that this will be where we end up, LOL…) On the International Level, you can also exit to Courtland Street and The Hilton will be directly across the street.

Okay, let’s take the escalators back up to the Lobby level, and then go up one more floor. Near the front entrance, the escalators will spill you out into a nice wide promenade area, which overlooks the entrance. If you take a left, that whole left side is the Atrium ballroom. Hard to know if the awards banquet will be there or in the other ballrooms on the Marquis Level, but there it is, just in case. At the escalators, if you take a right, there’s a large sculpture of a sail sitting on top of their Atrium bar, called Pulse. In front of it are lots of booths and square cushy seats, and this is a great spot to meet for drinks and socialize. But it’s not great for privacy, if that’s what you’re wanting. It’s an open plan, so it’s ideal for said socializing as well as people watching. If you keep heading to the right and then back just a tad, there’s High Velocity, which is their sports bar. It’s a little more private there, and so the energy level will be a little lower here.

Okay, let’s keep heading back, going past High Velocity, and angling back toward the front entrance. From here, you can go up some steps to the Pulse Loft, which overlooks the escalators and the promenade and Pulse bar.

Behind this (so kinda directly over the front entrance) is a set of bathrooms. Also, there are exits here if you need to smoke, and the stairs also take you down to where all the cars pull up to the entrance. Anyway, back at the bathrooms–go past that and on the left and right are entrances to two different skybridges. Before we take those, if you go past that, you’ll find more conference rooms, in case we have some there.

Okay, at the skybridge entrances. The one on the left will take you to Marquis Tower I and from there you can take the skybridge to the Peachtree Center Food Court. Lots and lots of food options here, from regular dining to fast food (as well as the CVS). The right hand entrance will take you to Marquis Tower II and the Suntrust Food Court. I’ve actually never been there, so can’t tell you what it’s like, but I think it’s smaller. But also from there, you can take the skybridge to the Hyatt Regency, if you want, which has a nice sports bar located directly where the skybridge spills you out. This might be a good spot if you need to meet where other conference goers won’t be around you. Also, if you’re a smoker, there’s a balcony right off of there where you can do your business.

Let’s zip back to Pulse bar (yay!) and if you head along the right-hand side you’ll find Sear bar and Sear Restaurant, which will probably be even more low-key. Past that is another set of bathrooms, and then the pool! Also, there’s a set of stairs that will take you down to the Lobby level.

In the center of all this, is the bank of elevators, which are glass-enclosed. The elevators are arranged by floors, so find the bank that services your floor, and you’re in business.

If you want to see floor plans, which oddly can’t be found on their site (except for the International Level), visit this page on Dragon*Con’s website and then click on the tab “Hotel Floor Plans”. It even has a PDF you can download. Handy, huh?

Anyway, hope this helps! Have fun and see you in Atlanta!

Photo source: By dbking (originally posted to Flickr as IMG_9475) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

RWA Countdown: Getting the most out of RWA–Some Tips for Newbies

krlqqghzI’ve only been once, so this is definitely a guide for those new to this conference. Hopefully this will help me provide you with some tips from a newbie’s perspective, since the experience was so recent. But it also means you won’t find veteran tips here, though I do have some location specific tips near the end.

I think Rule Number One to keep in mind is:

Most likely the person standing next to you is new too! At the very least, she (and sometimes he) will be nice or an introvert like most of us writers and won’t bite your head off if you initiate conversation. I’m serious. Don’t be afraid to introduce yourself while you’re waiting in line to get that free book from your favorite author. Who knows, that person could be screwing up the nerve to introduce herself to you!  Don’t know what to say as an icebreaker? The easiest one to remember and makes the most sense: So what kind of stories do you write?

Set a goal for the conference

This may sound weird, but this is a huge conference and it’s really easy to become overwhelmed and stand in a corner clutching your conference goody bag, wide eyed. You’ve spent a lot of money to come to it, and it would be a shame to go home and think it was a waste of said money, especially when the success hangs on you. I read this tip before I went to the conference last year, and it’s so true: set achievable goals. Before you head out, think about what would make you smile and feel like it was worth going–and be realistic. Don’t make it ‘come away with an agent contract’ or ‘everyone turns to me in a workshop and remarks how brilliant I am.’ Pitching to an agent? Your goal is to pitch to them without dying. Maybe make it a goal to meet five new people. Needing to hone your craft? Concentrate on the workshops you need. And don’t be distracted by what others are doing–remember, everyone has different goals. If your goal is honing your craft, don’t get distracted by all the people talking about all the free books they got. Sure you got some great free books, but standing in the lines made you miss one of your most-looked-forward-to workshops and you’ll be disappointed later.

Pack with care

Last week I talked about packing, so I won’t get into it too much here, but be aware of your body’s needs and the time constraints of the conference. Do you know that you have to be hydrated, or you’ll drop? Pack a water bottle and fill it at water fountains. It’s such a waste of time to stand in the long lines to get an over-priced bottle of water. Think about what you need to stay focused and happy, and see if there’s a way for you to pack something that will help you. Running around at the conference hotel for it five minutes before your pitch starts is a bad idea.

I also packed flattened boxes that were a good size for holding books, a roll of packing tape, and a sharpie. That way I didn’t need to hunt these down there and was able to ship back all my free books using the US Post Office’s media mail rate (muuuuch cheaper than regular mail, and cheaper than paying the overages airlines charge now).

Free books!

Yep, what you’ve been hearing is true. Books are given away like candy, and most of the time you can get them signed! I think I came away with 80+ books last year. Here’s what’s going on: publishers want to not only market their various imprints, they also want to help educate potential clients on what they look for, so they give them away to us. During various times of the day (printed in the schedule) there will be room(s) dedicated to certain imprints for their authors to sign books. You go in, find the authors you like, and stand in line. But don’t be one of those that goes to the front and just grabs a bunch; not only is it rude, but there are a limited number, and those patiently standing in line will be pissed if they see you do this, especially if there’s no books by the time they get to the table. It’s also disrespectful to the author. They are there to meet you.

Tips re: books

  • I had two of these reusable shopping totes that roll up small and fit in my purse. That way I was ready to snap it open and stuff it with books.
  • Some bring boxes to the signing rooms or snag empty ones in the rooms
  • Mail them back using USPS Media Mail
  • Return often to your room to offload your stack :)

Pitching

I’ve written several posts regarding this, Agent Pitch Prep Tip: Make Dossiers and Pitching at a Conference? Set Fire to the Rain! but one big thing that really helped was getting pitches out of the way first thing in the morning on the first day. Not only will this reduce your anxiety level for the rest of the conference, but you’re also pitching to an agent who’s fresh and hasn’t heard a zillion pitches already. Didn’t get your fave agent or editor? Hang around the pitch room–they post open pitch slots that you can nab.

Also, arrive early! I can’t tell you how many people lost out because they showed up just five minutes beforehand–that’s too late folks. It takes time to corral everyone into their lanes and feed them into the room. You need to be there in time for that. To be safe, get there 20-30 minutes before your pitch starts.

Handouts

This was my only sore point last year. Everything I read and researched online about what to expect said that at previous conferences, they’d handed out a thumb drive of all the workshop handouts, so I knew I’d have those to rely on if the presenter ran out, etc. But last year, they didn’t provide them. And they also didn’t have handouts printed for the attendees. You could go online to print them out, but I didn’t have a printer handy. If, like me, you like to have these during a session, go ahead and print them out before you go. One of my friend’s had done this and I was so envious.

Schedule

Mark not only your first choice, but your second. Sometimes workshops will get cancelled, or it’s not what you were expecting–now you have a backup to go to. (It’s okay to come and go during a session, just be quiet about it).

Food

Put granola bars or the like in your purse to tide you over–believe me, you’ll want these. Also, there are two food courts easily accessible from the Marriott without even having to go outside. There’s the Peachtree Center food court (which is huge, and also has a CVS)–there’s a skybridge from the Atrium level if you go to Marquis Tower I. Also on the Atrium level, if you go toward Marquis Tower II, you can access the SunTrust food court. There’s also PLENTY of dining outside the hotel.

Getting around

Hopefully they’ll provide maps of the hotel in our conference packets, since this is a large hotel with many conference rooms and ballrooms on several levels. If you want to see it beforehand, here’s a link to ones that Dragon*Con provides (I’m a regular attendee, which is why I’m so familiar with this hotel).

Dress

Dress professionally, you are your brand, so be conscious of how you’re presenting yourself, even if you’re not pitching. Even if you are, keep it up even after your pitches, as agents and editors may see you after. Think about what you’d wear to your first book signing and wear that.

Act professional

I love to party and drink with the best of them, but last year I refrained from partying–I had a few beers to relax, but that’s it. My goal wasn’t to party, plus I can start getting silly if I drink too much and I sure didn’t want a potential agent sitting a table over to witness me in that state. I’ve heard horror stories from other agents who’ve seen writers throwing up in hallways, etc.

In conclusion

I honestly think folks get out of an experience what they take into it. If you’re looking for things to be sour about, you’ll find them. But why not go into it with a positive attitude and count up the great things you experience? Go into it with a friendly attitude and everyone else will be friendly too.

What about you? Will this be your first time? If you’re a veteran, do you have any tips? I know I only scraped the surface…

RWA Countdown: Why Packing for a Trip is like Writing–Do It with Purpose or It Can Cost You

download (5)In exactly four weeks, myself and fellow romance writers will be converging on Atlanta for Romance Writer’s of America’s (RWA) national conference and I thought I’d dedicate the remaining Writer Wednesdays to posts on prepping for it, as well as tips.

To start off, this is a recycled post from last year, my first trip to RWA, and the prepping definitely paid off! This year I won’t be flying, but I might be taking Megabus instead of driving, which also has baggage restrictions.

*******

If you’re a romance writer, then you know that a week from now several thousand romance writers will be descending on Anaheim, CA for the annual Romance Writers of America (RWA) conference. I’m going for my first time, and it’s also the first time I’ve flown since the airlines started charging for extra baggage.

Yesterday morning I looked up the dimensions of the bags I’m allowed and the weight restrictions and started planning on how I could trim what I normally pack for a trip. That same morning, I came across Jami Gold’s post, The Ultimate #RWA12 Conference Packing List and it got me thinking–packing for a trip is a lot like writing. I love metaphors, let’s see how far I can run with this.

Know the purpose for your draft/trip

Each novel is going to go through multiple revision passes. In the early draft phase, some things are not as important and so it doesn’t pay to get worked up over it. For instance, a first draft is just getting your story basics down. The next pass will be structural, making sure you have a solid plot. It would be costly time-wise, to polish any of your prose at this stage, or to ask/pay someone else to give you line edits, since any line, paragraph or scene could change dramatically or get cut.

How is this like packing? If it’s just a quick trip to a familiar place, the stakes aren’t high, and you’re driving, you can be pretty casual about packing. You won’t be penalized for throwing anything or everything into your car and sorting it out later. You have a rough idea of what you need and go with it. Since the stakes aren’t high, it won’t matter if you forget something.

Weighing each word/item

Once we get to that final polish before submission, however, the stakes are different. Now you need to scrutinize every word and scene to make sure it serves the purpose of your story. I’m at this stage with MUST LOVE BREECHES. I’m doing a mind-numbing Find for a long list of words and phrases that could either be cut, or that could be red flags for my prose. I’m only on Chapter 8, but I’ve already cut over 800 words I did not need! I have to do it in chunks, because it is so tedious, but I know the story will be better in the end. I’m at the pre-submission stage for this WIP.

How is this like packing? It’s like my preparation now for the RWA conference. The stakes are high, it’s a costly trip, and I’ll be flying where I need to be careful about what I pack or the airline will charge me. So, I’m going through absolutely every article I’m bringing to see if it can serve several purposes, to see if I actually need it, and in the case of toiletries, if it can be poured into a smaller container. A small tube of toothpaste still gets the job done, but will be more efficient (like that shorter sentence after you trimmed out those words you didn’t need). For a normal trip, I already have a pre-packed toiletries bag I just pull out and throw in stuff I use everyday but don’t have duplicated. It’s quick, it’s efficient and I’m on the road, no agonizing. But I can’t do this for this trip. I’ll be taking everything out of that bag and evaluating it. Just like in a rough draft, it’s okay to write clichés or insert extra ‘baggage’ we don’t need, but for a final draft? No way.

Research

At some stage, you will need to do research for your novel, especially if the stakes are high. First drafts can have placeholders, but final drafts cannot. Some things you write will come from your acquired knowledge, but the true test is recognizing your own limitations and knowledge gaps and to take steps to amend them. You can also surprise yourself in what you find when you research that can make your story stronger.

How is this like packing? For my first writer’s conference, I was driving and I was going to a city I was familiar with, so some things I knew what to pack and plan for. But there were also gaps in my knowledge that I recognized and took the steps beforehand to research, mainly the agents I’d be pitching to. So I researched them, made dossiers, and packed them.

Not researching can also lead to missed opportunities. Case in point: I was perusing some posts on the conference and saw that Saturday night is a big dress-up deal, as in folks wear ball gowns! If I hadn’t taken the time to familiarize myself with what was happening, I wouldn’t have known and wouldn’t have packed one. Fortunately for me and my limited budget, I’m a denizen of Mobile and Mardi Gras balls, so I can simply choose one from my closet and pack it. Now, I understand that one can attend in business casual, but they’re in the minority and I would’ve hated missing an opportunity to dress up like that. How often do you get to wear a ball gown?

Personality and brand is important

While there are guides to writing well, at some point you need to be skilled enough to let your unique voice shine through your writing and know when to break the rules. You will also bring your own sensibilities and mindset into your writing. You also are nurturing a brand–you.

How is this like packing? There are tons of advice out there about what to pack and what to wear for your trip, but ultimately you need to be true to yourself. You’ll pack things that show your personality, sometimes without you even realizing what it says about you. Are you someone who always packs a deck of cards, just in case?

Since my RWA trip is about furthering my writing career, and is not just a trip to the beach with family, you better believe I’ll be packing with this in mind. Yesterday at Target, I bought a little Yoda plushie that I can attach to my conference bag to help distinguish it from the 2000 other bags, but I chose it because it’s f&*)*ing Yoda! And see, that’s part of my brand as a geek girl romance writer. Unfortunately my geek clothes are all super casual, so completely inappropriate for this conference. My funds didn’t allow me to purchase funky, dressier stuff only nice, classic clothes on clearance, but it will give a professional appearance which is vital. If I ever get successful, I’ll be able to not only afford it monetarily but flaunt convention a tad.

It can cost you

Failure to understand the nature of the writing business can cost you. The title of this post uses the phrase ‘do it with purpose’ instead of  ‘do it correctly’ for a reason, though. You need to go about writing with a clear purpose at every stage, but there is no “right” way to do it. However, if you fail to do it with purpose, it will cost you. Perhaps it’s not having patience enough to seek outside opinions and self-publishing your first novel. I just read a comment from someone who only had friends and family proof her work before she put it up. She got some pretty bad reviews, which she said stung at first. She admitted though that now that she’s going to critique groups, she’s realized her story could have been much better. The cost to her? Bad reviews and potential brand damage.

There are so many other ways it can cost you– submitting to agents/editors before the story is as polished as it can be, or not researching said agents/editors, will cost you the ability to pitch to them again for the same project, for example. Just like any stage of writing, this needs to be done with purpose as well.

How is this like packing? Used to be you could throw anything into a suitcase or more than one and check it. No longer. Money is tight for me, so it totally sucks that I have to pay $25 to check my bag, but I already know I won’t be able to take everything in a carry-on. However, I do not want to go over the 50lb limit, or check a second bag, so I’ll be going over everything to make sure I don’t incur any more costs. I’ll be packing with a firm purpose. Just like in writing, as I mentioned above, I’ll be scrutinizing every item to make sure it serves the purpose of this trip.

It can also cost you during your trip if the stakes are high. For instance, if I didn’t do any research or planning and just quickly packed for this trip willy-nilly, oh boy would it cost me professionally when I arrived. I would have been ill prepared and come across as unprofessional.

Veteran Writers/Packers

Because I’m a new writer my knowledge is pretty limited. Especially compared to the multi-published authors. There are a lot of things that are second nature to them that I have to consciously do, or strive for, or learn. I’ll make mistakes along the way. I already have, in fact. I’m learning.

How is this like packing? Veteran conference goers will have an easier time than I will packing for this trip. They know what to expect, what to bring. They’ve made mistakes in the past and learned from them, and get better and better each time they go.

How about you? Are you going to RWA? Did this metaphor make a lick of sense? Do you see other ways packing is like writing that I missed?

The Inside Scoop on Getting In Bookstores – Things You Should Know

1.10.10Barnes&NobleCliftonCommonsByLuigiNoviMost people who know me online probably don’t know this, but I work in a local independent bookstore and I’ve been wanting to write this blog post for a while, because nothing turns me from being the ra-ra writer supporter I am with my writer friends online and locally than when I’m at the bookstore and an indie or self-pubbed author comes in with the attitude. And generally it’s the entitlement attitude. Before I go further, I want to qualify all this in case some interpret this to mean that writers owe obeisance to bookstores and should be humble and stuff. No. That’s not what I’m saying — I’m not saying bookstores are above writers in any way, shape or form. Yes, they are gatekeepers, but I’d like to think that they are/could be an indie writer’s ally or partner. Some of this post is going to necessarily be anecdotal, but I’ll also share some tips, as well as some ground-breaking changes in how distributors are handling indie books.

Be aware of how you present yourself

Just as with anything in this business, be conscious of how you are presenting yourself as this is a professional setting. Be courteous and friendly as you would in any other kind of business setting. Think of bookstores as potential clients, maybe, if that will help? This may sound like a no brainer. But let me tell you, in my role on the bookstore side more often than not, authors harm themselves in this regard. I’ve seen the following:

  • Writers who were visiting from out of town, and were only here for that day, and were upset the owner/decision maker wasn’t in at the time they showed up. And they took it out on me, the store clerk. I wanted to say to these authors they shouldn’t have assumed this and called ahead and made an appointment. I even had one go so far as to insist I call the owner (on his day off!) and tell him this author was in town for just that day. I refused and tried to explain this would only turn off the owner and he got more and more pushy and later harassed me with phone calls. He ended up leaving a courtesy copy. It later sold, but did we ever reorder? No. And it had potential as it was geared to a popular regional cooking style in the area. But the author was so obnoxious to the owner, it soured it for him.
  • We have one local author my boss won’t order any new releases from because when that author had their (I’m using a non-gender form on purpose) debut signing at the bookstore, they were extremely rude to my boss. This not only affected their future releases, but also that current one as it was afterward buried in the regional fiction section, spine out, and it’s not one they push or recommend. And we recommend LOTS of books EVERY day.
  • Writers who come in with the attitude that we’re obligated to carry their book

Okay, even I’m getting turned off by the negativity of my own post, LOL. So let’s move on and talk about how you can get in bookstores, yay! Because despite how it might sound, I DO want you to be in them.

Price your books with bookstores in mind

Most authors who come into the store don’t understand this and want to sell their book to us at the retail price. Bookstores are a business and just like any others that sell products, we order our books (products) at wholesale prices so we can turn a profit. Otherwise, how could we exist? Typically, we get a 40% discount from the major distributors like Ingram and Baker & Taylor. We also have the ability to return them if they don’t sell (and that’s important to remember). So if you go with a small press, make sure they offer their books through one of those two distributors. That will make it a LOT easier to get picked up as the bookstore can order it with all the other books they order. Self-published? Set your retail price with enough of a margin so that giving bookstores this discount won’t cut into the production cost.

Some bookstores allow you to sell your book via consignment, but be aware that not all do (ours doesn’t). And if they do, understand that they’re doing it to support local authors knowing that they aren’t making anything off of it. Check a bookstore’s website to see their policies. For instance, this indie bookstore in Atlanta, Bound To Be Read, has this on their website:

If your book is available through a distributor such as Ingram or Baker and Taylor, please contact Jeff McCord by e-mail or by phone at 404-522-0877.  If your book is self-published or published through a small press, we may consider taking it on consignment after review.  Because of limited space, consignment is usually restricted to local authors.  Call or e-mail Jeff McCord for more information.

Book Soup in LA has this posted (misspellings are theirs):

All consignment requests must be made in writing. We regret that we are unable to accomodate walk-in visits. In keeping with our general inventory only bound books with legible titles on their spines will be considered. To submit a book for consideration, please drop off a copy of the book along with a one-paragraph letter including your telephone number, mailing address, and promotinal material and a self-addressed stamped envelope with sufficient return postage. The submission should be marked “Consignment Request” and dropped off at the Book Soup information desk or mailed to the store address. Requests which fail to provide the information listed above will not be considered. Our review process takes four to twelve weeks. The book (not the promotional materials) will be returned in the self-addressed envelope, along with a letter notifying you of our decision. Books submitted without a self-addressed stamped envelope will be held at Book Soup information desk for pick-up. After 90 days, books not picked up will be recycled. If your book is accepted for consignment, you will have the opportunity to discuss your work with our buyers. Unfortunately, prior to acceptance, requests to contact bookstore personnel in person, by phone, or by email will not be granted. With this in mind, the decision made by our buyers is final. Book Soup is proud to support the writing community through our consignment program. Our buyers do the best to provide shelf space and display opportunities for consignment books, while still keeping in mind our inventory needs and the interest of our customers. Consignments are books that Book Soup agrees to add to our inventory with the understanding that payment will only be made on completed sales. We look forward to reviewing your work and we thank you for your interest in Book Soup.

Let friends know it’s there!

Okay, you’re in the bookstore, yay! But like with any other aspect of indie publishing, you need to promote. Let folks know it’s there. We have some local indie authors who do well because they tell their friends we have copies. One local author even has her car wrapped! It worked at least once, because someone came in the store saying they’d seen it and had checked out the blurb online and came into our store and bought it. We have others though that don’t take this step and the book never sells (only making my boss more reluctant to buy books from other authors since he can’t return them if they don’t sell and he doesn’t take consignments).

Make the decision easier

I asked my boss what would make it easier (besides being available through Ingram) and he said to give him a review copy and a flyer with the blurb, how to order, and reputable reviews (not reviews on Amazon–his words, not mine). I also think it makes a difference making an appointment or catching him when he’s there. Sending it via mail is too easy to put off. A review copy is important because the decision maker needs to be able to determine whether they can SELL the book to their customers. They’re not going to outlay money for a book that will just sit on the shelf collecting dust. Indie bookstore owners know their local market and what sells. Plus, they could become a new fan and actually actively pimp your book if they end up loving it! We definitely have some faves at the store that we pimp.

New policies at the distributors have changed the landscape!

I read about this initially on Kristine Kathryn Rusch’s blog back in April and thought at the time it would be a great addition to this post if I ever got around to writing it. But I think this post on Judy Goodwin’s blog summarizes it succinctly and has a link to Rusch’s post if you want to read more. Basically, the two major distributors (Ingram and Baker & Taylor) have changed their policies and now list indie books mixed in with traditional titles and offer the 40% discount and same return policy. This is HUGE folks. As it also means you also have a chance of getting picked up by the chain bookstores too! It’s not all indie books–I think it’s only with books in CreateSpace’s Extended Distribution and other qualifiers– Goodwin’s post has the deets.

In summary, put yourself in the bookstore owner/manager’s shoes and understand this is a business, not a lending library or non-profit whose mission is to carry your book. And like with any other aspect of this business, do your homework and research what your stores’ policies are. I also apologize if any of this came across as scolding–that was not my intention. I want to see indie authors be successful but just have witnessed too many fail due to things they can control, and I hate to see that.

What about you? Have you had trouble getting in local indie stores? What have you found that works? What are your indie stores policies? Do you have any other tips to share?

Tweetable: The Inside Scoop on Getting In Bookstores – Things You Should Know @AngelaQuarles  <–Click to tweet

Photo source: By Nightscream (Own work) [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Is your WIP in need of some manscaping? Pluck out those to-be verbs (From the Archives)

I published this post originally back in the fall of 2011 and as I sit here completely blank on what to post today, I thought I’d pull up this fun post. So here’s the old post, with some small changes:

************

Is your WIP in need of some manscaping? Pluck out those to-be verbs. Or at least eliminate enough of the suckers so they’re not populating your manuscript like the wiry hairs on a hirsute male.

Argh! As my fingers poise over my keyboard, I hesitate. Recently, I’ve become loathe to point out style advice like this when critiquing because this might be someone’s style. In fact, my fingers hesitated so much, I just returned to writing this after taking a 2 hour procrastinating tour around twitter and klout. Sigh. Okay, getting over it. Onward.

So, what do I mean by to-be verbs? These are any time we use is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been in constructing our sentences. These verbs indicate a state of being, which is important to remember when applying this guideline because sometimes what we really want to illustrate is movement, not a persistent state. But! There are times when we DO want to indicate a state of being and using a to-be verb is entirely appropriate rocks (like the to-be I used in the second sentence of this paragraph).

Like any writing tip, this is a guideline only. Not a rule. You should only write what resonates with you.

In case you do want to see how it might improve your story, here are some structures to look out for in your WIP. I like to see them as flags of possible weak areas. I find them, analyze, and either leave them as is, or change them:

  • was + -ing. Just convert the -ing into the action verb. These are the easiest to fix. He was riding > He rode. Sometimes we can go even further, because it’s still not specific enough. For instance, he was speaking before a large group could be changed to he spoke before a large group, but that’s still pretty blah. What kind of mood is he in? What’s happened leading up to this? Can we use this to illustrate the character? Possibly! Maybe something like: he hunched over the microphone, eyes downcast. He swallowed and… you get the idea…
  • was + adjective. They can indicate we’re telling and not showing. Consider something as simple as this: He was gorgeous. That’s telling. How was he gorgeous? Describe what makes him gorgeous to the narrator. As often is the case when showing and not telling, we will use more words to show his hunkiness to the reader. Just using shortcuts like this, or the house was elegant, the food was tasty are like placeholder cards (cardboard cutouts!) scream ‘cardboard cutout!’ in your manuscript telling the reader how they should feel about a character or envision the scene. Better to take the time to describe it in a way that empowers them to feel and see it on their own without tacking on such a nonspecific descriptor. The reader will be pulled into the story in a much more visceral way. Plus, everyone’s tastes are different differ, so what’s tasty or beautiful to one person might not be that way for another, so we’re missing a chance for character development here.
  • was + verb + infinitive verb. Here are two examples from my WIP: she was tempted to say became she itched to say and they were due to leave  became they planned to leave.
  • was + adjective + noun. Again from my WIP: She longed to tell him, but really that was a stupid idea became She longed to tell him, but that would top the list of stupid things to do.
  • was + noun forms of verbs. Just convert it to its original verb. For instance, she was the inventor of… can be she invented
  • was + any kind of word expressing emotion. For example: He was scared about the monster under his bed. Don’t label the emotion, show it instead. A five-headed beast with poisonous drool lurked under his bed, without a doubt. Just his luck, too, today of all days. He sidled across the wall, one eye peeled

There are probably other structures where this pesky guy shows up, but these should get you started. The point is to be aware of it and really scrutinize whether it’s the best way to describe it captures your character or scene. Sometimes it is does! Or it would be very strange to convert it. Or that’s the voice of your character. Or it fits the rhythm. But if you’re getting feedback that your prose is lackluster, consider going on a fishing expedition through your WIP with a pair of tweezers in hand. Sometimes it will be really hard to find another way to say it (at least it is for me!) but when I finally do, it pops! And generally characterizes my heroine or hero in a much better way. I’m offering this tip precisely because it is something I still struggle with it and didn’t find a heck of a lot of practical advice out there, other than don’t use it. I liked Shirley Jump’s example (tip #2) in her article Show Not Tell: What the Heck is that Anyway?

And in case you thought my opening sentence was just for shock value I wrote the opening sentence for shock value, I really did have a purpose. Some people really like overly hairy men, who am I to judge? Same with writing guidelines like this. If it works for you, do it, otherwise don’t; leave the hairs in, or pluck ‘em.

How about you? Do you struggle like me trying to convert to-be verbs? Do you have other tips for helping to eliminate them where advisable?

Tweetables:

  • Is your WIP in need of some manscaping? Pluck out those to-be verbs @AngelaQuarles  <–click to tweet
  • If your prose is lackluster, consider going on a fishing expedition through your WIP for to-be verbs @AngelaQuarles <– click to tweet

Do you know your own GMC? Not your characters, yours as a writer?

By Auregann (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

For writers of genre fiction where plot and story are central to the success of the book, we’re often told to clarify our characters’ GMCs. For non-writers, this stands for Goal, Motivation, and Conflict. And it’s best if you can have both an external and an internal one for your Main Character (and your other Main Character if it’s a romance) and your Antagonist (if it’s sentient).

This can be easily transformed into a sentence: Hero wants x because y, but z happens. Internal GMCs would be: Hero needs x because y, but z.

Anyway, as writers we can be so focused on perfecting our craft that sometimes we can neglect ourselves and hamper our goal. Last week I was at my monthly critique group meeting and one of us has multiple unpublished novels under her belt. She’s definitely put in the 10,000 hours of practice as she’s been writing for the last 10 years and she is extremely talented. Her prose drips with ethos and voice, her scenes and characters come alive, and she has great stories to tell. But you can’t read any of her work. In fact, though she’s been doing this for so long, we’re part of only a handful who actually knows she writes. She also has a fear of having folks she knows reading her work (I think she’s fine with strangers).

And this is all fine if she is writing solely for her own benefit. So at the meeting I asked her what her ultimate goal is, as that will help clarify whether she needs to go through the time-consuming and often gut-wrenching process of getting your work out there. And she would like to be published. She’s starting to research going the indie route and we were discussing it with great energy.

So to grossly simplify my good friend’s GMC, it would be: She wants to be published because she’d like to share her work with others, but she lacks time. And her internal GMC would be hampered by a fear.

Why is this good to know for yourself? Because just like with your Main Character, you need to know your goal, what’s opposing you, and then launch yourself into your own Story World and start tackling the steps to take you to your own Goal. Along the way you’ll have setbacks, your internal fears will hamper you, but keep yourself focused on your main goal and you’ll get there.

And if you need some inspiration to help you keep going through your Story World, an earlier post of mine talks about pushing past each setback you’ll hit on your journey, Writer Wednesday: When You Hit That Wall, Do You Nurse Your Head, Or Climb Over? Then once you picture yourself climbing over (or around or under) that wall and the multitude of writers who are not doing that, read Kristen Lamb’s post What Are the Odds of Success? …Really? In it, she maintains that “It has been statistically demonstrated that only 5% of any population is capable of sustained change.” So with each metaphorical wall you hit as a writer, remember that only 5% get to the other side. Do you want to be part of that 5%?

Do you know your own GMC? What fears are holding you back? Do you have your next immediate goal you need to tackle?

Tweetables:

  • Do you know your own GMC? Not your characters, yours as a writer? @AngelaQuarles <– Click to tweet
  • Have you launched yourself into your own Story World? Know your own GMCs @AngelaQuarles <– Click to tweet

Image source: By Auregann (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Guest Post: Stephanie Lawton on The Art of Genre Hopping

blog button

Excited to have fellow Mobilian Stephanie Lawton on my blog today to talk about her new release, Need, which is the follow-up to her debut release Want! Take it away, Stephanie!

*****

Thanks, Angela, for the opportunity to say a few things about my new release, Need, genre-hopping and nontraditional publishing. Quite a mouthful, that, but I assure you they’re related and relevant to most writers.

In an ideal writing world, we don’t sit down and immediately conjure up the perimeters of a specific genre. Instead, we tell our story the way it needs to be written. Only when it’s finished do we begin to think of its marketability and where it fits in the pigeon holes of the publishing world.

Nine times out of ten, it’s easy to tell where a book belongs. Narrator under eighteen? It’s probably YA. Silk sheets and a red room of fun toys? Probably erotic romance or erotica (or perhaps comedy, but I’ll leave that one alone …)

So what happens when your story genuinely doesn’t fit a specific category, or doesn’t fit well enough to be a sure thing for an agent or publisher to be comfortable selling? Answer: You go indie.

For some, this means hitting up indie publishers, which are doing quite well in this changing market. They’re also generally more open to well-written stories that may not conform to what’s currently popular or projected to be so. The good ones still demand quality, but they often see the value in putting something out there that appeals to specific readers, or readers who are tired of the same big-house tropes.

This is where I lucked out with my romance series. The first book, Want, was published as upper-YA. The story hinges on the heroine being seventeen, but the issues she’s facing are very adult and all the rest of the characters in the book are adults. Is it YA? Not really. But is it adult? Most potential readers would automatically assume it’s not based on the narrator’s age.

A year after publication we’ve seen the rise of a category known as New Adult. Bingo. And guess who pioneered this wildly successful trend? Indie writers (many self-published) and indie publishers.

There were many demands from readers for a second book to find out what happened next to a certain character, so I penned Need. This time, I wrote from the main male adult character’s POV (I can’t call him a protagonist or antagonist and be completely accurate). He’s twenty-eight, beyond New Adult and well beyond YA.

Plus, when his story began pouring out, it was really adult, as in practically erotic romance. When I first sent it off to my indie publisher (right of first refusal and all that) I figured there was no way they’d let me get away with veering so far away from the first book’s genre. I honestly expected a big ‘ole “Hell no!” complete with finger snaps.

But guess what? They loved it. What’s more, readers are loving it.

The moral of the story, boys and girls, is to take a chance, write what you love, and trust that there are options for your story and readers who will jump at the chance to delve into something off the beaten path.

Happy writing and reading!

Need’s blurb:

NeedIsaac Laroche is cursed. All he wants to do is hide out and feel sorry for himself. Never mind that he got caught sleeping with his seventeen-year-old piano student, or that he abandoned her when the truth was exposed.

Isaac’s feisty high school sweetheart has different plans. Heather Swann has returned to their hometown of Mobile, Alabama, to regroup after breaking up with her troll of a fiancé. She’s restless and looking for a diversion, but she bites off more than she can chew when she sets her sights on rehabilitating Isaac with her unorthodox sexual, mental, and physical plans.

The two quickly reconnect, but their happiness is threatened by family secrets, old vendettas and the death of a beloved father-figure.

Can Heather handle Isaac’s baggage, or will her own come back to haunt them both?

Where to get your hands on it:

Inkspell Publishing (paperback and digital) | Barnes and Noble (paperback and Nook) | Amazon (paperback and Kindle) | All Romance eBooks (digital) | The Book Depository (paperback) | Kobo (digital)

Author bio:

photo 3After collecting a couple English degrees in the Midwest, Stephanie Lawton suddenly awoke in the deepest reaches of the Deep South. Culture shock inspired her to write about Mobile, Alabama, her adopted city, and all the ways Southern culture, history and attitudes seduce the unsuspecting.

A lover of all things gothic, she can often be spotted photographing old cemeteries, historic buildings and, ironically, the beautiful beaches of the Gulf Coast. She also has a tendency to psychoanalyze people, which comes in handy when creating character profiles.

Links for stalking!

Author website | Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads

Thanks Stephanie for giving us this peek into indie publishing! Visitors, have you found this to be the case too with indie books? Have you let a story take you where it needed to go and found acceptance? This is definitely an exciting time to be a writer!